Other Programs


IN JANUARY AND FEBRUARY, CELEBRATE AND KEEP THE DREAM ALIVE!

A CHANCE MEETING WITH Dr. KING

I HAD A DREAM: A CONVERSATION WITH A FRIEND
During a dream, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. meets actor Gregory Gibson Kenney at the Lincoln Memorial. Dr. King shares four speeches, how he wishes to be remembered, and how fear is no longer a factor in Dr. King's survival.
Mr. Kenney portrays both Dr. King and the narrator.


CELEBRATE WOMEN'S HISTORY AND "MARCH" WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH

Rosa Parks: Please Keep Your Seat
Actor Gregory Gibson Kenney performs his one man tribute to PRESIDENTIAL MEDAL of FREEDOM recipient, Mrs. Rosa Parks.  Join Just'n Truth, a young man who was on the bus the day Mrs. Parks refused to give up her seat. Just'n will lead you up to that day including events that happened and the Civil Rights Movement that followed.


  TOGETHER : A TRIBUTE TO THE 70'S PITTSBURGH STEELERS
Actor Gregory Gibson Kenney performs as Tank Sreleets, a member of the PIttsburgh Steelers. Tank shares the story of a team that went from losing to winning in more ways than one. Experience how they accomplished their goal by working hard, refusing to quit, doing whatever it took and believing in each other to become a team that was the first to win four Superbowl trophies. Take a journey back in time and experience how they captured the heart of a city by bringing diverse cultures together making PIttsburgh SOMEPLACE SPECIAL, THE CITY OF CHAMPIONS.


Rosa Parks said, "It is to the youth we must look." With those words, actor Greg Kenney last week inspired Penn Hills Library patrons to continue the struggle for civil rights.
In honor of Black History Month, Kenney presented "Rosa, Please Keep Your Seat.
The program highlighted the woman's refusal to give her bus seat to a white person in Montgomery, Ala., and the impact of that refusal on the Civil Rights Movement.
Kenney portrayed Just'n Truth, a young man on the bus that day in 1955.
He related the character's thoughts as the woman defended her right to keep her seat.
In character, he quoted Ms. Parks when she was confronted by the bus driver.
"I don't care what you do, I'm not moving."
He also recounted an exchange between the woman who wanted to keep her seat and a police officer who had been called to respond to the situation.
"Why do you push us around?" Ms. Parks asked the officer.
"I don't know," said the officer, "but you're under arrest."
Kenney's character told the audience, "Little did I know it,I was watching the beginning of the civil rights movement."
He said Ms. Parks, a department store employee, didn't refuse to give up her seat because she was tired after a long day of work.
"She was tired of being treated less than equal."
As a rising civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led a boycott of the Montgomery transit system that resulted in desegregation of that city's buses in 1956.
If Ms. Parks hadn't refused to give up her seat, Kenney said, King might not have had the same impact.
For her participation in the civil rights movement, Ms. Parks earned a number of awards, including the Congressional Medal of Freedom.
At the end of the presentation, Kenney urged the audience, especially children, to fight for positive change in the 21st century.
Mary Ann Zeak, children's librarian, said the audience enjoyed Kenney's performance.
"We had very favorable comment from the patrons."
Kenney has presented other programs at the library, portraying baseball legends Roberto Clemente and Jackie Robinson, that were received well.
"It's like the person is up there talking.
"He is really good," said Mrs. Zeak.
Costs of last week's program, which was free to the audience, were underwritten by Friends of Penn Hills Library.

Actor Brings meaning of Rosa Parks' stance to life